Research

Gene Found to Control Regeneration of Injured Muscle by Adult Stem Cells

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online in Cell Reports. The study results further suggest that this “overlooked” gene may play an important role in sarcopenia, the loss of muscle tissues with age. “This [research] provides a potential path to clinical treatments that accelerate muscle regeneration following traumatic injury, or in patients with certain types of adult onset muscular dystrophy,” says Robert Schneider, PhD, the Albert B. Sabin Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Pathogenesis and associate dean for the Office of Therapeutics Alliances at NYU Langone. Read more…


New DNA Sequencing Method Reveals How Bacteria Resist Antibiotics

A new technology can read the order, or sequence, of the “letters” making up DNA code with enough accuracy to reveal how bacteria use high-speed evolution to defeat antibiotics. That is the finding of a study led by senior author Evgeny Nudler, PhD at NYU Langone Medical Center and published in the journal Nature. The technology, called Maximum Depth Sequencing (MDS), eliminates the error introduced by core methods behind current high-speed DNA sequencing machines to catch genetic changes so rare that older methods could not tell them apart from machine error. Read more…