Research

Sleep-Walking Neurons: Brain’s GPS Never Stops Working—Even During Sleep

In a study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience online and led by Gyorgy Buzsaki, MD, PhD,  researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center found that navigational brain cells that help sense direction are as electrically active during deep sleep as they are during wake time—and have visual and vestibular cues to guide them. Such information could be useful in treating navigational problems, among the first major symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders. Read more…


New Study Affirms the Role of Specialized Protein in Assuring Normal Cell Development

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and New York University have demonstrated that a specialized DNA-binding protein called CTCF is essential for the precise expression of genes that control the body plan of a developing embryo. The findings, published online in Science, add important details to how so-called Hox genes help cells keep their positions straight and in the right positions back to front. “Previous research has shown that CTCF acts as a key insulating barrier to prevent mistakes in cells as they multiply and differentiate,” says Varun Narendra, the study’s lead author, and a 5th-year PhD student in developmental biology at NYULMC and HHMI. Read more...