Research

Coping Mechanism Suggests New Way to Make Cancer Cells More Vulnerable to Chemotherapies

The same signal that drives aggressive growth in a deadly cancer cell type also triggers coping mechanisms that make it “notoriously” hard to kill, according to a study published online in Cell. When stressed, this cell type—far more than most cancer cells—encases its genetic messages in protein globs called stress granules that lessen the effect of chemotherapies. Led by two researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and Thomas Jefferson University, the study revolves around the gene KRAS. “Our results explain why KRAS mutant cells are so good at resisting treatments, and suggest a way to make them many times more vulnerable to existing chemotherapies,” says senior study author Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, senior vice president and vice dean for science and chief scientific officer. Read more...


Combination Immune Therapy Shows Promise Against Hodgkin Lymphoma

The combination of two new drugs that harness the body’s immune system is safe and effective, destroying most cancer cells in 64 percent of patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma, according to the results of an early-phase study led by Catherine Diefenbach, MD at the NYULMC Perlmutter Cancer Center. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego, the study in 19 patients found that the combination of brentuximab vedotin, marketed as Adcetris®, and nivolumab, known as Opdivo®, decreased tumor size or spread (achieved remission) to some degree in all patients after 3 months of treatment. Read more...