the philips lab
departments of medicine, cell biology and pharmacology, NYU cancer institute, Division of Rheumatology, NYU School of Medicine
Current Lab Members!

Mark R. Philips, MD photo

Mark R. Philips, MD
Principle Investigator
philim01@med.nyu.edu

Rebecca Zuckerman photo

Rebecca Zuckerman
Lab Manager
Rebecca.Zuckerman@nyumc.org

Helen Court, PhD photo

Helen Court, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Helen.Court@nyumc.org

My project focuses on the requirement of post-translational modification of Ras oncogenes, specifically methylation by ICMT (isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase), to drive neoplasia. I am working with a mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to answer this question.

Nicole Fehrenbacher, PhD photo

Nicole Fehrenbacher, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Nicole.Fehrenbacher@nyumc.org

K-Ras4B is the most important oncogene in human cancer and its cellular membrane association is necessary for the sustainability of tumorigenesis. The aim of my project is to identify novel mediators and inhibitors of K-Ras4B membrane association.

Caroline Liot, PhD photo

Caroline Liot, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Caroline.Liot@nyumc.org

Post-translational modifications of the Ras proteins are key determinants of their localization and trafficking, allowing them to be targeted to functionally distinct cellular compartments, which ultimately leads to distinct downstream signaling outputs. Ras is also a major oncogene which mutations have been identified in numerous types of human cancers. My project thus aims at studying the role of some these post-translational modifications in tumorigenesis by using molecular and cellular tools and animal models.

Wenjuan Su, PhD photo

Wenjuan Su, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Wenjuan.Su@nyumc.org

Adaptive immunity depends on lymphocyte adhesion that is mediated by integrins. The small GTPase Rap1 regulates integrin-mediated adhesiveness through its effectors, such as Riam and RapL. My project is to study the molecular mechanism of lymphocyte adhesion and physiological function of Rap1 by using cellular and molecular tools and animal models.

Frederick Tsai photo

Frederick Tsai
MD/PhD Student
Frederick.Tsai@nyumc.org

The KRAS gene, the most frequently mutated oncogene in human cancer, encodes two splice variants, K-Ras4B and the alternate isoform K-Ras4A, of which little is known. I am investigating the cell biology of K-Ras4A by characterizing the targeting signals for K-Ras4A localization and determining the role K-Ras4A plays in mediating oncogenesis.

Mo Zhou photo

Mo Zhou
Graduate Student
Mo.Zhou@nyumc.org

My project is to identify and characterize the chaperones of cytosolic Ras protein in non-vesicular transport pathways..

Adam Mor, MD photo

Adam Mor, MD
Postdoctoral Fellow
mora01@med.nyu.edu

Wasif M. Abidi, MD/PhD Student photo

Wasif M. Abidi
MD/PhD Student
wma202@med.nyu.edu

Iaan Ahearn, MD/PhD Student photo

Ian Ahearn
MD/PhD Student
aheari01@med.nyu.edu

Jean Park, MD photo

Jean Park, MD
Rheumatology Fellow
parkj06@med.nyu.edu

Steve Quatela, MD PhD Student photo

Steven Quatela
MD/PhD Student
seq202@med.nyu.edu

Laatasha Wright, PhF photo

Latasha Wright, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
latasha.wright@gmail.com

G. Steven Martin, PhD, Visiting Professor photo

G. Steven Martin, PhD
Visiting Professor
gsm@berkeley.edu