The Abramson Lab

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Abramson Lab

Logos for NYU School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Division of Rheumatology

Lab Overview

Role of Oral and Intestinal Microbiota in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Principal Investigators: Steven B. Abramson, MD, Dan. R. Littman, MD, PhD
Co-Investigators: Jose U. Scher, MD, Eric Pamer, MD, Michael Dustin, PhD, Walter Bretz, DDS

Gut microbiota have long been thought to contribute to inflammatory diseases, and multiple reports in animal models and humans suggest that antibiotic treatment alters autoimmune disease manifestations. We have recently demonstrated in rodents (Dr. Littman’s lab) that specific microbes induce the differentiation of Th17 cells in the intestinal lamina propria. There is strong genetic and therapy-based evidence that “pro-inflammatory” Th17 and “antiinflammatory” regulatory T cells (Treg) have critical roles in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and Crohn’s disease. We are now studying the role of gut (intestinal and oral) microbiota (bacterial communities) in RA and other inflammatory arthritides. Our primary hypotheses are that: (1) characterization of Th17-inducing microbes in human intestine will provide insight into disease pathogenesis; and (2) directed manipulation of the gut microbiota will result in alteration of arthritis biofmarkers, including Th17/Treg balance. ... [MORE]

Cartilage Biology

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common musculoskeletal diseases affecting millions of patients. It is a painful disabling disease that is charactized clinically by joint stiffness and dysfunction. OA has been considered a disease of articular cartilage. Due to advancement in imaging and molecular cell biology it is increasingly ... [MORE]

Stem Cells

The study of stem cells will revolutionize the practice of medicine in coming years. At the NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases Musculoskeletal Center of Excellence, in studies led by Drs. Glyn Palmer and Mukundan Attur, we have embarked on a collaborative project to study the use of stem cells to regenerate and repair cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA ). ...  [MORE]
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