Burn injuries are reported each year, with a good number occurring in the home. You can take the following simple steps to reduce your child's risk of getting burned:

Sleeping  

  • Make sure your child's sleepwear is flame-resistant.

Cooking  

  • Turn pot handles to the center or rear of the stove when cooking and use the back burners whenever possible.
  • Test the temperature of food heated in a microwave before giving it to a child. Microwaves tend to heat unevenly and some portions can be very hot.
  • Remember that kitchen appliances and cookware remain hot enough to burn for quite a while after you are done using them.

Eating and Drinking  

  • Do not drink hot liquids when holding a baby. The liquid could spill and burn the baby.
  • Avoid using a tablecloth when children are learning to walk. A child could try to use it to pull herself up and knock a heavy object or something containing hot liquid onto herself.

Bathing  

  • Use a baby bath thermometer to test the temperature of your child's bath water.
  • Lower the hot-water heater setting to 120°F (49°C) or the low-medium setting.

Fire Prevention  

  • Keep cigarette lighters and matches away from children. Even a child as young as two can figure out how to use them.
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