David M Rapoport

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David M Rapoport, M.D.

Professor; Med Dir NYU Sleep Disorders Center
Department of Medicine (Pulmy&CCM Div)
NYU Sleep Disorders Center

Clinical Addresses

462 FIRST AVENUE, SUITE 7N-3
BELLEVUE HOSPITAL
NEW YORK, NY 10016
Hours: Mon. 9 - 5; Tue. 9 - 5; Wed. 9 - 5; Thu. 9 - 5; Fri. 9 - 5
Handicap Access: yes
Phone: 212-263-8423
Fax: 212-562-4677

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Medical Specialties

Pulmonary Medicine

Medical Expertise

Snoring Problems, Sleep Apnea/Snoring Disorders

Insurance

AETNA HMO, AETNA INDEMNITY, AETNA MEDICARE, AETNA POS, AETNA PPO/EPO, AFFINITY, AFFINITY EXCHANGE- ESSENTIAL, CIGNA EPO/POS, Cigna PPO, EBCBS EPO, EBCBS HLTHY NY, EBCBS HMO, EBCBS INDEMNITY, EBCBS MEDIBLUE, EBCBS PATHWAYS / PATHWAYS ENHANCED, EBCBS POS, EBCBS PPO, HIP ACCESS I, HIP ACCESS II, HIP CHLD HLTH, HIP EPO/PPO, HIP FAM HLTH, HIP HMO, HIP MEDICAID, HIP MEDICARE, HIP POS, LOCAL 1199 PPO, METROPLUS CHLD HLTH, METROPLUS EXCHANGE PLANS, METROPLUS FAM HLTH, MULTIPLAN/PHCS PPO, Medicare, MetroPlus Medicaid, NY MEDICAID, NYS EMPIRE PLAN, OXFORD EXCHANGE, OXFORD FREEDOM, Oxford Liberty, Oxford Medicare, Tricare, UHC COMMUNITY & STATE PLAN, UHC EPO, UHC HMO, UHC MEDICARE, UHC POS, UHC PPO, UHC TOP TIER, UNITED EXCHANGE- COMPASS, UPN Elite

Insurance Disclaimer: Insurance listed above may not be accepted at all office locations. Please confirm prior to each visit. The information presented here may not be complete or may have changed.

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Board Certification

1977 — Ab Internal Medicine - Internal Medicine
1980 — Ab Internal Medicine (Pulmonary Disease)
2007 — Ab Family Medicine (Sleep Medicine)

Education

1974 — Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Medical Education
1974-1975 — St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital (Medicine), Internship
1974-1977 — St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital (Internal Medicine), Residency Training
1977-1979 — NYU Medical Center (Pulmonary Diseases), Clinical Fellowships

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Research Summary

<br>The recently described clinical syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS), possibly affecting 2% to 10% of the adult population, is characterized by episodic sleep-induced changes in upper airway patency. These produce respiratory compromise ranging from partial to complete occlusion. Because obstruction represents a major challenge to homeostatic respiratory control mechanisms and because it can be completely reversed with a simple nasal mask/airway pressure device known as a nasal CPAP, OSAS provides an extraordinary opportunity to study control of breathing in humans.<p><br><br>Upper airway obstruction in OSAS results from interaction between subtle anatomic airway narrowing, increased wall collapsibility due sleep-induced loss of baseline muscle tone, and insufficient inspiratory phasic dilator muscle contraction to oppose the negative intraluminal pressure resulting from diaphragmatic contraction. This collapsible behavior can be modelled with a Starling resistor; exploring the properties of this model should provide insights into pathophysiology and treatment. One key observation is that a sinusoidally varying driving force (inspiratory diaphragmatic drive) acting through such a collapsible tube results in an inspiratory waveform which "flow limits." Although defined by pressure/flow relationships, flow limitation can be recognized by a flat contour of the inspiratory waveform in the flow/time display.<p><br><br>Appreciation of the information content of this easily obtained and noninvasive measurement has provided three research directions in our laboratory: 1) defining the role of the upper airway in sleep-related changes in respiratory control in normal subjects and patients with cardiorespiratory failure resulting in apnea and chronic hypercapnia; 2) developing diagnostic techniques to screen patients for the occurrence of sleep-related respiratory abnormalities; and 3) developing a technique for closed-loop computer-controlled regulation of the treatment for OSAS, e.g., a variation on nasal CPAP which automatically seeks the optimal pressure on a continuous basis.<p><p><br><br>

Research Interests

-Causes of Sleep Disordered Breathing (Sleep Apnea). -Treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing. -Epidemiology of Sleep Disordered Breathing. -Control of Breathing. -Control of the Upper Airway.

Research Keywords

control of breathing, respiratory physiology, sleep, sleep apnea, Starling resistors, upper airway.