Nunzio Pomara

Biosketch / Results /

Nunzio Pomara

Professor, Department of Psychiatry
Professor, Department of Pathology


Contact Info

Address
1 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10016

646/754-4848
Nunzio.Pomara@nyumc.org

Education

1972-1976 — SUNY Downstate, Medical Education
1976-1977 — Metropolitan Hospital-New York Medical College, Internship
1977-1980 — Metropolitan Hospital-New York Medical College, Residency Training
1980-1982 — Wayne State University-Lafayette Clinic, Clinical Fellowships

Research Summary

A major focus of Dr. Pomara’s research has been to elucidate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that may contribute to individual vulnerability to drug induced cognitive and psychomotor toxicity in the elderly. He has shown that certain variants of the APOE and TOMM40 genes increase risk for drug-induced adverse events unrelated to pharmacokinetic factors and likely reflecting pharmacodynamic mechanisms.

Other important contributions include his early reports of increased activity in the HPA axis associated with both aging and AD, as determined by studies of baseline cortisol and dexamethasone response. These results led to the first pilot clinical trial that examined the cognitive effects of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, in AD. Dr. Pomara also provided the first report on an absence of a cortisol response to naltrexone and an elevation in CSF-glutamate in Alzheimer’s patients.

Dr. Pomara additionally presented the first evidence that late life depression, a condition associated with increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or prodromal phase, may be accompanied by disturbances in central and peripheral metabolism of amyloid-beta, a peptide implicated in AD. More recently, he has been collaborating with the NYU Cohen Veterans Center to identify biomarkers for PTSD/TBI.

Research Interests

Pharmacogenetics, Alzheimer's Disease, drug-induced cognitive toxicity, late-life depression

Abnormality in glutamine-glutamate cycle in the cerebrospinal fluid of cognitively intact elderly individuals with major depressive disorder: a 3-year follow-up study
Hashimoto, K; Bruno, D; Nierenberg, J; Marmar, C R; Zetterberg, H; Blennow, K; Pomara, N. Abnormality in glutamine-glutamate cycle in the cerebrospinal fluid of cognitively intact elderly individuals with major depressive disorder: a 3-year follow-up study. Translational psychiatry. 2016 Mar 1;6:e744-e744 e744 (2006272)

Is there Progress? An Overview of Selecting Biomarker Candidates for Major Depressive Disorder
Young, Juan Joseph; Silber, Tim; Bruno, Davide; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac Robert; Pomara, Nunzio; Marmar, Charles Raymond. Is there Progress? An Overview of Selecting Biomarker Candidates for Major Depressive Disorder. Frontiers in psychiatry. 2016 ;7:72-72 (2112422)

A comparison of hippocampal volume and integrity: Which is the better predictor of cognitive decline?
Bruno, D; Ciarleglio, A; Grothe, M J; Nierenberg, J; Bachman, A; Teipel, S J; Petkova, E; Sidtis, J; Adrenkani, B; Pomara, N. A comparison of hippocampal volume and integrity: Which is the better predictor of cognitive decline? [Meeting Abstract]. Alzheimer's & dementia. 2015 July 2015;11(7):P698-P699 (1924872)

The association of output order and variability in free recall with cognitive abilityand hippocampal volume in elderly individuals
Bruno, D; Grothe, M J; Nierenberg, J; Sidtis, J; Teipel, S J; Pomara, N. The association of output order and variability in free recall with cognitive abilityand hippocampal volume in elderly individuals [Meeting Abstract]. Alzheimer's & dementia. 2015 July 2015;11(7):P574-P574 (1924892)

Output order and variability in free recall are linked to cognitive ability and hippocampal volume in elderly individuals
Bruno, Davide; Grothe, Michel J; Nierenberg, Jay; Sidtis, John J; Teipel, Stefan J; Pomara, Nunzio. Output order and variability in free recall are linked to cognitive ability and hippocampal volume in elderly individuals. Neuropsychologia. 2015 Nov 22;80:126-132 (1858772)