David Gutstein

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David Gutstein, M.D.

Clinical Associate Professor;
Department of Medicine (Cardio Div)
NYU Cardiac Exercise / Stress Lab

Clinical Addresses

522 FIRST AVENUE
SMILOW 804
NEW YORK, NY 10016
Phone: 212-263-5666

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Medical Specialties

Cardiology

Clinical Responsibilities

David E. Gutstein, M.D., is an attending in Nuclear Cardiology at the NYU Medical Center. A native of Chicago, he attended Northwestern University for both his undergraduate studies and medical school. He completed his internship and residency at Harvard's Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He trained in clinical and nuclear cardiology at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. He obtained his research training in molecular cardiology in a program sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. After spending several years on staff at the Mount Sinai Medical Center, he was recruited to the faculty of the NYU Medical Center in 2002. Dr. Gutstein is a nationally recognized and well-published molecular cardiology researcher with funding from the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association.

Insurance

AETNA HMO, AETNA INDEMNITY, AETNA MEDICARE, AETNA POS, AETNA PPO/EPO, AFFINITY, AFFINITY EXCHANGE- ESSENTIAL, CIGNA EPO/POS, Cigna PPO, EBCBS EPO, EBCBS HLTHY NY, EBCBS HMO, EBCBS INDEMNITY, EBCBS MEDIBLUE, EBCBS PATHWAYS / PATHWAYS ENHANCED, EBCBS POS, EBCBS PPO, GHI CBP, HEALTHREPUBLIC, HIP ACCESS I, HIP ACCESS II, HIP CHLD HLTH, HIP EPO/PPO, HIP HMO, HIP MEDICARE, HIP POS, LOCAL 1199 PPO, MAGNACARE PPO, MULTIPLAN/PHCS PPO, Medicare, NY MEDICAID, NYS EMPIRE PLAN, OSCAR, OXFORD EXCHANGE, OXFORD FREEDOM, Oxford Liberty, Oxford Medicare, Tricare, UHC COMMUNITY & STATE PLAN, UHC EPO, UHC HMO, UHC MEDICARE, UHC POS, UHC PPO, UHC TOP TIER, UNITED EXCHANGE- COMPASS, UPN Elite

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Board Certification

2006 — Ab Internal Medicine - Internal Medicine
2009 — Ab Internal Medicine (Cardiovascular Disease)

Education

1991 — Northwestern University Medical School, Medical Education
1991-1994 — Beth Israel Hospital (Medicine), Residency Training
1994-1995 — Hadassah University Hospital (Cardiology Research), Clinical Fellowships
1995-1999 — Mount Sinai Medical Center (Cardiology), Clinical Fellowships

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Research Summary

Intercellular communication in the heart is mediated by gap junctions, channels that are critical for normal heart morphogenesis and for cardiac conduction. Although gap junctions play a vital role in cardiac physiology and are known to be dysregulated in disease, no available therapeutics are presently targeted to them. To investigate pathways that regulate and are regulated by gap junctions, Dr. Gutstein studies two specific areas of gap junction biology. First, Dr. Gutstein uses developmental models to investigate the effect of gap junctions on cardiac development. Germline loss of connexin43 (Cx43), the predominant cardiac gap junction component protein, is known to cause right ventricular outflow tract malformations, perinatal death and coronary anomalies. Research in the Gutstein laboratory suggests that the Cx43-null coronary phenotype may result from loss of Cx43 specifically in the neural crest population. However, the mechanisms by which Cx43 regulates the contribution of the neural crest to coronary development are not known. Ongoing studies in the laboratory are directed at identifying and characterizing how gap junctions may influence coronary patterning. The second area of interest in Dr. Gutstein's laboratory is the study of gap junction remodeling (GJR). Structural GJR is an abnormal localization of connexin protein along the sarcolemma of the myocyte and/or a generalized down-regulation of gap junction protein. The process of GJR has been strongly associated with arrhythmic cardiac conditions such as myocardial hypertrophy, infarction and heart failure. Dr. Gutstein has developed a novel method to induce GJR in the mouse by pacing at rates just over that of sinus rhythm for six hours. This is the first such method for use in the mouse that does not cause myocardial injury, hypertrophy or a decrease in cardiac function. Studies in the laboratory use this model to study the mechanisms by which GJR develops and the physiologic effects of GJR in the heart.

Research Interests

Dr. Gutstein's research interests revolve around the role of intercellular communication in cardiac development and function. Gap junctions are specialized intercellular channels that allow the passage of ions and small molecules between cells. Connexin43 (Cx43), the most abundant gap junction protein in the heart, plays a critical role in heart development, cardiac function and conduction. Understanding developmental pathways and mechanisms in the embryonic heart may provide insight into the pathophysiology of heart failure, a process often associated with recapitulation of fetal gene expression patterns.

Research Keywords

cardiovascular development<br>gap junction<br>connexin