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Ramanuj Dasgupta

Research Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Scientific Director - RNAi Facility

Contact Info

Address
522 First Avenue
New York, NY 10016

212/263-9247
Ramanuj.Dasgupta@nyumc.org

Research Interests

Finally, an important aspect of our research will be the combination of RNAi technology with small molecule screens in the hope of isolating more specific drug targets for the Wnt pathway. Though identifying specific targets of small molecules is always a challenge, our approach of comparing and integrating information about specific phenotypes from the RNAi and the small molecule screens, should aid in making target identification faster. This approach will allow us to not only propose new testable hypotheses about the mechanisms of the regulators of the Wnt-signaling pathway, but also in drug discovery with relevance to treatment and prevention of Wnt pathway-related diseases.|Finally, an important aspect of our research will be the combination of RNAi technology with small molecule screens in the hope of isolating more specific drug targets for the Wnt pathway. Though identifying specific targets of small molecules is always a challenge, our approach of comparing and integrating information about specific phenotypes from the RNAi and the small molecule screens, should aid in making target identification faster. This approach will allow us to not only propose new testable hypotheses about the mechanisms of the regulators of the Wnt-signaling pathway, but also in drug discovery with relevance to treatment and prevention of Wnt pathway-related diseases.|The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway is one of a core set of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways that regulates many aspects of animal development. Aberrant Wnt signaling has been linked to human disease, such as cancers of the intestine, stomach, breast, liver, and skin. Mutations in the Wnt genes or in those that encode regulators of this pathway can cause devastating birth defects, including debilitating abnormalities of the central nervous system, axial skeleton, limbs, and occasionally other organs.|The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway is one of a core set of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways that regulates many aspects of animal development. Aberrant Wnt signaling has been linked to human disease, such as cancers of the intestine, stomach, breast, liver, and skin. Mutations in the Wnt genes or in those that encode regulators of this pathway can cause devastating birth defects, including debilitating abnormalities of the central nervous system, axial skeleton, limbs, and occasionally other organs.|The focus of my laboratory is to integrate a variety of functional genomic and proteomic high-throughput screens to generate a global picture of how the Wnt signaling pathway is regulated at a molecular level. We are also interested in understanding how components of the Wnt pathway may interact with other signal transduction cascades during development and disease. We are using a newly developed technology, called RNA-interference (RNAi) to systematically knockdown gene function on a genome scale and testing the effects (phenotype) of reduced gene function on cells and in the developing embryo. The RNAi screens are used to assign new function to genes in the context of the Wnt pathway.|The focus of my laboratory is to integrate a variety of functional genomic and proteomic high-throughput screens to generate a global picture of how the Wnt signaling pathway is regulated at a molecular level. We are also interested in understanding how components of the Wnt pathway may interact with other signal transduction cascades during development and disease. We are using a newly developed technology, called RNA-interference (RNAi) to systematically knockdown gene function on a genome scale and testing the effects (phenotype) of reduced gene function on cells and in the developing embryo. The RNAi screens are used to assign new function to genes in the context of the Wnt pathway.

TCF7L1 Modulates Colorectal Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Expression of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene EPHB3
Murphy, Matthew; Chatterjee, Sujash S; Jain, Sidharth; Katari, Manpreet; DasGupta, Ramanuj. TCF7L1 Modulates Colorectal Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Expression of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene EPHB3. Scientific reports. 2016 ;6:28299-28299 (2158042)

Inhibition of beta-catenin-TCF1 interaction delays differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells
Chatterjee, Sujash S; Saj, Abil; Gocha, Tenzin; Murphy, Matthew; Gonsalves, Foster C; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hayward, Penelope; Akgol Oksuz, Betul; Shen, Steven S; Madar, Aviv; Martinez Arias, Alfonso; DasGupta, Ramanuj. Inhibition of beta-catenin-TCF1 interaction delays differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Journal of cell biology. 2015 Oct 12;211(1):39-51 (1803322)

Wnt inhibition leads to improved chemosensitivity in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
Dandekar, Smita; Romanos-Sirakis, Eleny; Pais, Faye; Bhatla, Teena; Jones, Courtney; Bourgeois, Wallace; Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hermiston, Michelle L; Dasgupta, Ramanuj; Morrison, Debra J; Carroll, William L. Wnt inhibition leads to improved chemosensitivity in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. British journal of haematology. 2014 Jul 4;167(1):87-99 (1066072)

New Insights about Wnt/beta-Catenin Pathway Mechanisms from Global siRNA Screens
Gocha, T; Dasgupta, R. New Insights about Wnt/beta-Catenin Pathway Mechanisms from Global siRNA Screens IN: Wnt Signaling in Development and Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Biological Functions. Hoboken, New Jersey : Wiley Blackwell, 2014. p.137-151 (1606022)

Wnt Co-receptor Lrp5 is a Driver of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Lam, Anna P; Herazo-Maya, Jose D; Sennello, Joseph A; Flozak, Annette S; Russell, Susan; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; DasGupta, Ramanuj; Varga, John; Kaminski, Naftali; Gottardi, Cara J. Wnt Co-receptor Lrp5 is a Driver of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. American journal of respiratory & critical care medicine. 2014 Jul 15;190(2):185-195 (1033782)